ÁMPL Magazine_ArtistAgustiSousa Blanch

Materials Used: Acrylic and Mix media on canvas

Studio Based: Based in Barcelona

This week, we are delighted to introduce Agusti Sousa blanch based in Barcelona who depicts scenes of human beings and daily life with his own distorted experience and feelings on canvas.

“I’m particularly interested in everyday life, so most of the scenes depicted in my work are excerpts from there. During the process, I tend to distort reality based on my own experience and the way I feel and pay attention to how the painting is evolving, so the final result is always unpredictable, which is satisfying. Painting is an introspective process in which I try to know a bit more about myself, my surroundings and the people involved, our place in the world, the experiences we live, and our emotions. It is all about the human condition.”

금주 AMPL은 바르셀로나 출신 Agusti Sousa blanch를 소개합니다. Agusti는 자신의 경험과 감정을 왜곡시켜 캔버스에 인간과 일상의 장면으로 담아내어 묘사하고 있습니다.

“특히 저는 일상생활에 관심이 많아서 작품에 나오는 장면 대부분의 아이디어와 근원이 이쪽에 있는거 같아요. 그 과정에서 자신의 경험과 느낌에 따라 현실을 왜곡하고 그림이 어떻게 진화하고 있는지 주목하기 때문에 최종 결과는 항상 예측할 수 없어 만족스럽죠. 제 그림은 제 자신과 주변 환경, 관련된 사람들, 세상에서의 우리의 위치, 우리가 사는 경험, 그리고 우리의 감정에 대해 조금 더 알기 위해 노력하는 저만의 내성적인 과정입니다. 그것은 곧 인간의 상태에 관한 것이죠.”

“Green Flash”, Acrylic on paper, 18x24cm, 2021




Before the interview, please let us know about yourself.

Hi! I am a Barcelona-based artist born in 1983. Graduated from Escola Massana and Esardi, I’ve been involved in the world of arts since I was a teenager, combining my studies in the Art School with a part-time job as a pre-press assistant.

How would you define your work?   Can you tell us about the process in short?

I’m particularly interested in everyday life, so most of the scenes depicted in my work are excerpts from there. During the process, I tend to distort reality based on my own experience and the way I feel, and pay attention to how the painting is evolving, so the final result is always unpredictable, which is satisfying.

Looking back a few years, at what point did know you wanted to be an artist?

When they asked me as a child, my answer was always “a painter”, so I guess I could say ever since. Although the education system didn’t pay much attention to arts back then (hope it is different now), I’ve been lucky to meet some teachers who encouraged me. It has been a long path until defining myself and working as a full-time artist.

“Girl in blue and a moon”, Acrylic on paper, 18x24cm, 2021

What leads you to depict figures like the main character in paintings and what influences the colour choices of the backgrounds?

Most of the figures in my paintings are the people around me, although I also use models when needed. The series ‘Paradise is a state of mind’ for example, was conceived during the lockdown due to the pandemic, in the studio at home, so the people represented are professional online models.

The colour rarely responds to an objective reality (if there is such a thing), I rather apply it in a free way, paying attention to how I feel and usually using bright complementary colours that dialogue with each other like the Fauves and Expressionists Masters did.

Is there any particular material or expression technique that you consider important in drawing?

From my point of view, the most important fact about drawing is minding the details which otherwise would go unnoticed. Drawing is about observing. I see more things when drawing than when just looking. 

Where do you draw inspiration to build up your distinctive portraiture on canvas? How do you come up with ideas?

I usually represent day-to-day life. I try to figure out where I’m involved in and in which way I am part of it. At some point any moment can be a painting, with a personal point of view and some work behind.

“Waiting for news”, Acrylic on paper, 15x20cm, 2021
“Paradise is a state of mind 3”, Mixed media on paper, 42×59,4cm, 2021
“Paradise is a state of mind 5”, Mixed media on paper, 42×59,4cm, 2021

Could you share with us some insights on your recent painting for instance, ‘Green Flash’ and ‘Waiting for news’?   Is there any particular story or meaning behind another artwork?

Green Flash’ and ‘Waiting for news’ are both moments captured in a common situation that I thought was worth paying attention to. ‘Waiting for news’ is just a person looking at the phone, but that includes millions of possibilities; now imagine ‘Green Flash’ where the main character is looking inward!

If each painting has a different story, what kind of theme do you work on?

Effectively, each painting has a story behind it, but all of them are about the same I guess. Painting is an introspective process in which I try to know a bit more about myself, my surroundings and the people involved, our place in the world, the experiences we live and our emotions. It is all about the human condition.

Is there something that you hope the viewer takes away from your paintings?

I do not pretend to send a clear message. I’m glad other people are able to see new things in my paintings based on their own experiences and feelings. Degas said ‘Art is not what you see, but what you make others see’ and that is sincerely uncontrollable. Any of my paintings can be interpreted in many ways; they don’t belong entirely to you as an author. What I do expect for my art is that it moves the viewer.

How are your surroundings affecting your practice?

Completely. My environment is something I care much about. It affects not only my work, but my mood, as any other human being. Obviously, the way I feel is transferred to my work, so it is essential in both ways, as a living and working practice. They go hand by hand.

What are your plans for the near future?

A bigger studio would be great! I’m going to need more space.